Title IX

Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any education program or activity operated by a recipient that receives federal financial assistance. Title IX Covers sexual harassment that happens in a school’s “education program or activity.”

Not just “on campus” situations. That includes locations, events, and circumstances where a school exercises substantial control over the context of the alleged harassment and the person accused of committing sexual harassment.

Sexual Harassment may be committed by any person upon any other person, regardless of the sex, sexual orientation, gender, and/or gender identity of those involved.

Sexual Harassment Means:

Conduct on the basis of sex that satisfies one or more of the following:

    1. Quid Pro Quo:
      1. A School Employee
      2. conditions the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the School,
      3. on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct; and/or

 

    1. Sexual Harassment:
      1. unwelcome conduct,
      2. determined by a reasonable person,
      3. to be so severe, and
      4. pervasive, and,
      5. objectively offensive,
      6. that it effectively denies a person equal access to the School’s education program or activity.

 

  1. Sexual assault, defined as:
    1. Sex Offenses, Forcible:
      1. Any sexual act directed against another person,
      2. without the consent of the Complainant,
      3. including instances in which the Complainant is incapable of giving consent.
    2. Forcible Rape:
      1. Penetration,
      2. no matter how slight,
      3. of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or
      4. oral penetration by a sex organ of another person,
      5. without the consent of the Complainant.

A school can never rely on restricting constitutionally protected speech as a way of showing the school satisfied its duty not to be deliberately indifferent to alleged sexual harassment.

Once a school has actual knowledge of sexual harassment or allegations of sexual harassment, the school has to respond and take action. A school has actual knowledge when the school has notice that a person may have been victimized by sexual harassment.

Any person, whether the alleged victim or a parent, friend, or bystander, has the right to report sexual harassment to put the school on notice. Reports can be verbal or written.

The anti-retaliation provision in the final regulations also expressly states that engaging in protected speech under the First Amendment never constitutes retaliation.

Grievance procedures require the school’s process to be “prompt and equitable,” meaning it must be a timely response to discrimination and provide both parties equivalent rights during the disciplinary process rather than having one-sided due process. For example, if the accused student is given a right to have an attorney present, so may the accusing student.

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Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

Consent is an informed and freely and affirmatively communicated willingness to participate in a sexual activity. Consent can be expressed either by words or by clear and unambiguous actions if those words or actions create mutually understandable permission regarding the conditions of each instance of sexual activity. It is the responsibility of the person who wants to engage in the sexual activity to ensure that they have the consent of the other person to engage in each instance of sexual activity. Since individuals may experience the same interaction in different ways, it is the responsibility of each party to determine that the other has consented before engaging in the activity.

If consent is not clearly provided prior to engaging in the activity, consent may be ratified by word or action at some point during the interaction or thereafter, but clear communication from the outset is strongly encouraged.

For consent to be valid, there must be a clear expression in words or actions that the other individual consented to that specific sexual conduct. Reasonable reciprocation can be implied. For example, if someone kisses you, you can kiss them back (if you want to) without the need to explicitly obtain their consent to being kissed back.

Consent can also be withdrawn once given, as long as the withdrawal is reasonably and clearly communicated. If consent is withdrawn, that sexual activity should cease within a reasonable time.

Consent to some sexual contact (such as kissing or fondling) cannot be presumed to be consent for other sexual activity (such as intercourse). A current or previous intimate relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent.

Proof of consent or non-consent is not a burden placed on either party involved in an incident. Instead, the burden remains on Hallmark University to determine whether this Policy has been violated. The existence of consent is based on the totality of the circumstances evaluated from the perspective of a reasonable person in the same or similar circumstances, including the context in which the alleged incident occurred and any similar, previous patterns that may be evidenced.

Supportive measures are free, individualized services designed to restore or preserve equal access to education, protect safety, or deter sexual harassment.

There doesn’t need to be a formal complaint for an alleged victim to receive supportive measures.

Supportive measures support a student, and they aren’t punitive or disciplinary with respect to another student.

Supportive measures are designed to restore or preserve equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity without unreasonably burdening any other person.

The San Antonio Rape Crisis Center
24 hr. Hotline: 210-349-7273
Online Hotline: Click Here

RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)
Online Hotline: Click Here

Family Violence Prevention Services (FVPS)
FVPS has been helping victims of domestic violence in San Antonio since 1977. FVPS began as an emergency shelter for women and children and now it offers an array of shelter, transitional housing, counseling, children’s and legal services to help individuals and families recover from the pain and long-term effects of domestic violence.
24 hr. Hotline:210-733-8810

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE)
For adults and adolescents ages 17 and above
Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital
8026 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, Texas, 78229
Phone (ER) 210-575-8168

For children and adolescents ages 16 and under
The Children’s Hospital of San Antonio
333 N. Santa Rosa St, San Antonio, Texas, 78207
Phone (ER) 210-704-2190

San Antonio Police Department – Victim Advocacy
210-207-2141

National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

Services provided free of charge

1. What is sexual violence?
Sexual violence includes sexual assault, sexual battery and sexual coercion. All such acts are forms of sexual harassment and covered under Title IX.

2. How do I know if I’ve been sexually assaulted?
The Texas Penal Code – Section 22.011 defines sexual assault in several ways. Generally, sexual assault is any unwanted, non-consensual sexual contact against any individual by another. Sexual assault can occur either forcibly (against a person’s will) or when a person cannot give consent (under the age of consent, intoxicated, developmentally disabled, mentally/physically unable to consent, etc.).
For more information on determining whether a sexual assault has occurred, please visit the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network’s (RAINN) information page entitled “Was I Raped?”

3. How do I know if I’ve been sexually harassed?
Sexual harassment is any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or verbal/physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
– Submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment, student status or participation in University activities.
– Such conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it substantially interferes with an individual’s education, employment, or participation in University activities; or
– Such conduct is intentionally directed towards a specific individual and unreasonably interferes with that individual’s education, employment, or participation in University activities.
Sexual harassment includes any criminal offense of a sexual nature under the Texas Penal Code.
Examples of sexual harassment include displays of sexually suggestive materials or content, sexual jokes or innuendos, sexual touching, unwelcome flirting or advances, pressuring you for sex, repeated requests for dates, persistent email or social network communications, requiring sexual favors in exchange for a grade, a favor or some other benefit, sexual contact, sexual assault.

4. What should I do if I think I’ve been sexually harassed or victimized?
Contact the Title IX Coordinator at (210) 969-7523, by email, or you may also fill out a complaint form and deliver it the Title IX Coordinator at 10401 IH-10 West, San Antonio, TX 78230.

5. Are women the only victims of sexual harassment or sexual violence?
No, both females and males can be victims of sexual harassment and/or sexual violence. For more information regarding sexual assaults on males please visit the RAINN’s information page regarding Male Sexual Assault.

6. Is it possible to be sexually harassed/assaulted by someone of the same gender?
Yes. If you have been subjected to unwanted sexual contact or sexual harassment, your gender and the gender of the alleged perpetrator are irrelevant. Such conduct is prohibited by Title IX.

7. The definition of sexual assault says it can occur either forcibly (against a person’s will) or when a person cannot give consent. What does “when a person cannot give consent” mean?
In certain situations, a person does not have the capacity to agree to participate in consensual sex. Examples include individuals who are under the age of consent, intoxicated, developmentally disabled, mentally/physically unable to consent, etc. Anyone engaging in sexual contact with someone who is unable to give consent may be committing sexual assault.

1. To whom should I report that I’ve been sexually harassed/assaulted?
Sexual harassment and acts of sexual violence should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator.

2. Will my complaint remain confidential?
The privacy of the parties is a priority to Hallmark University. However, sometimes, limited information must be disclosed in order to fully investigate a complaint. If you are concerned about confidentiality, discuss this issue with the Title IX Coordinator.

3. What if I want to remain anonymous?
Your confidentiality will be protected to the maximum extent possible, but anonymity may hinder an investigation into your complaint.

4. Do I have to identify the alleged perpetrator?
Yes, in order to conduct a thorough investigation, the alleged perpetrator must be identified.

5. I’m concerned that reporting might make matters worse. Should I still file a complaint?
Yes. If you have concerns for your safety, Hallmark University can provide escort services and take other steps to assist you.

6. My friend told me he or she was assaulted. What can I do to help?
Be supportive – listen to what she or he has to say then encourage your friend to report the incident to the police or to the Title IX Coordinator. You should also consider reporting the incident yourself.

7. Do I have to report to Hallmark University? Is there someone outside Hallmark University I can report to?
You also can report to the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights. However, Hallmark University is committed to addressing and preventing sexual harassment and sexual violence.

Per federal statute 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, Hallmark University annually reports campus crime and safety statistics to the Department of Education. Details of Clery Act reporting, and the most recent statistics available for Hallmark University, can be found here.

The Clery Act specifically requires that certain crimes that occur on campus, in off-campus buildings owned or controlled by Hallmark University, or on any public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, be reported by means of this report. These statistics are compiled using definitions of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program. To report a crime, download the Hallmark University Crime-Incident Report Form (PDF).

Nondiscrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance

Click Here

Hallmark University Title IX Non-Discrimination & Grievance Process Policy

Click Here

  • What is Consent?

    Consent is an informed and freely and affirmatively communicated willingness to participate in a sexual activity. Consent can be expressed either by words or by clear and unambiguous actions if those words or actions create mutually understandable permission regarding the conditions of each instance of sexual activity. It is the responsibility of the person who wants to engage in the sexual activity to ensure that they have the consent of the other person to engage in each instance of sexual activity. Since individuals may experience the same interaction in different ways, it is the responsibility of each party to determine that the other has consented before engaging in the activity.

    If consent is not clearly provided prior to engaging in the activity, consent may be ratified by word or action at some point during the interaction or thereafter, but clear communication from the outset is strongly encouraged.

    For consent to be valid, there must be a clear expression in words or actions that the other individual consented to that specific sexual conduct. Reasonable reciprocation can be implied. For example, if someone kisses you, you can kiss them back (if you want to) without the need to explicitly obtain their consent to being kissed back.

    Consent can also be withdrawn once given, as long as the withdrawal is reasonably and clearly communicated. If consent is withdrawn, that sexual activity should cease within a reasonable time.

    Consent to some sexual contact (such as kissing or fondling) cannot be presumed to be consent for other sexual activity (such as intercourse). A current or previous intimate relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent.

    Proof of consent or non-consent is not a burden placed on either party involved in an incident. Instead, the burden remains on Hallmark University to determine whether this Policy has been violated. The existence of consent is based on the totality of the circumstances evaluated from the perspective of a reasonable person in the same or similar circumstances, including the context in which the alleged incident occurred and any similar, previous patterns that may be evidenced.

  • What are Supportive Measures?

    Supportive measures are free, individualized services designed to restore or preserve equal access to education, protect safety, or deter sexual harassment.

    There doesn’t need to be a formal complaint for an alleged victim to receive supportive measures.

    Supportive measures support a student, and they aren’t punitive or disciplinary with respect to another student.

    Supportive measures are designed to restore or preserve equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity without unreasonably burdening any other person.

  • Resources for Victims of Sexual Violence

    The San Antonio Rape Crisis Center
    24 hr. Hotline: 210-349-7273
    Online Hotline: Click Here

    RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
    Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)
    Online Hotline: Click Here

    Family Violence Prevention Services (FVPS)
    FVPS has been helping victims of domestic violence in San Antonio since 1977. FVPS began as an emergency shelter for women and children and now it offers an array of shelter, transitional housing, counseling, children’s and legal services to help individuals and families recover from the pain and long-term effects of domestic violence.
    24 hr. Hotline:210-733-8810

    Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE)
    For adults and adolescents ages 17 and above
    Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital
    8026 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, Texas, 78229
    Phone (ER) 210-575-8168

    For children and adolescents ages 16 and under
    The Children’s Hospital of San Antonio
    333 N. Santa Rosa St, San Antonio, Texas, 78207
    Phone (ER) 210-704-2190

    San Antonio Police Department – Victim Advocacy
    210-207-2141

    National Domestic Violence Hotline
    1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

    Services provided free of charge

  • Sexual Harassment/Assault FAQs

    1. What is sexual violence?
    Sexual violence includes sexual assault, sexual battery and sexual coercion. All such acts are forms of sexual harassment and covered under Title IX.

    2. How do I know if I’ve been sexually assaulted?
    The Texas Penal Code – Section 22.011 defines sexual assault in several ways. Generally, sexual assault is any unwanted, non-consensual sexual contact against any individual by another. Sexual assault can occur either forcibly (against a person’s will) or when a person cannot give consent (under the age of consent, intoxicated, developmentally disabled, mentally/physically unable to consent, etc.).
    For more information on determining whether a sexual assault has occurred, please visit the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network’s (RAINN) information page entitled “Was I Raped?”

    3. How do I know if I’ve been sexually harassed?
    Sexual harassment is any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or verbal/physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
    – Submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment, student status or participation in University activities.
    – Such conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it substantially interferes with an individual’s education, employment, or participation in University activities; or
    – Such conduct is intentionally directed towards a specific individual and unreasonably interferes with that individual’s education, employment, or participation in University activities.
    Sexual harassment includes any criminal offense of a sexual nature under the Texas Penal Code.
    Examples of sexual harassment include displays of sexually suggestive materials or content, sexual jokes or innuendos, sexual touching, unwelcome flirting or advances, pressuring you for sex, repeated requests for dates, persistent email or social network communications, requiring sexual favors in exchange for a grade, a favor or some other benefit, sexual contact, sexual assault.

    4. What should I do if I think I’ve been sexually harassed or victimized?
    Contact the Title IX Coordinator at (210) 969-7523, by email, or you may also fill out a complaint form and deliver it the Title IX Coordinator at 10401 IH-10 West, San Antonio, TX 78230.

    5. Are women the only victims of sexual harassment or sexual violence?
    No, both females and males can be victims of sexual harassment and/or sexual violence. For more information regarding sexual assaults on males please visit the RAINN’s information page regarding Male Sexual Assault.

    6. Is it possible to be sexually harassed/assaulted by someone of the same gender?
    Yes. If you have been subjected to unwanted sexual contact or sexual harassment, your gender and the gender of the alleged perpetrator are irrelevant. Such conduct is prohibited by Title IX.

    7. The definition of sexual assault says it can occur either forcibly (against a person’s will) or when a person cannot give consent. What does “when a person cannot give consent” mean?
    In certain situations, a person does not have the capacity to agree to participate in consensual sex. Examples include individuals who are under the age of consent, intoxicated, developmentally disabled, mentally/physically unable to consent, etc. Anyone engaging in sexual contact with someone who is unable to give consent may be committing sexual assault.

  • Reporting FAQs

    1. To whom should I report that I’ve been sexually harassed/assaulted?
    Sexual harassment and acts of sexual violence should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator.

    2. Will my complaint remain confidential?
    The privacy of the parties is a priority to Hallmark University. However, sometimes, limited information must be disclosed in order to fully investigate a complaint. If you are concerned about confidentiality, discuss this issue with the Title IX Coordinator.

    3. What if I want to remain anonymous?
    Your confidentiality will be protected to the maximum extent possible, but anonymity may hinder an investigation into your complaint.

    4. Do I have to identify the alleged perpetrator?
    Yes, in order to conduct a thorough investigation, the alleged perpetrator must be identified.

    5. I’m concerned that reporting might make matters worse. Should I still file a complaint?
    Yes. If you have concerns for your safety, Hallmark University can provide escort services and take other steps to assist you.

    6. My friend told me he or she was assaulted. What can I do to help?
    Be supportive – listen to what she or he has to say then encourage your friend to report the incident to the police or to the Title IX Coordinator. You should also consider reporting the incident yourself.

    7. Do I have to report to Hallmark University? Is there someone outside Hallmark University I can report to?
    You also can report to the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights. However, Hallmark University is committed to addressing and preventing sexual harassment and sexual violence.

  • Clery Act Information

    Per federal statute 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, Hallmark University annually reports campus crime and safety statistics to the Department of Education. Details of Clery Act reporting, and the most recent statistics available for Hallmark University, can be found here.

    The Clery Act specifically requires that certain crimes that occur on campus, in off-campus buildings owned or controlled by Hallmark University, or on any public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, be reported by means of this report. These statistics are compiled using definitions of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program. To report a crime, download the Hallmark University Crime-Incident Report Form (PDF).

  • Nondiscrimination Information

    Nondiscrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance

    Click Here

    Hallmark University Title IX Non-Discrimination & Grievance Process Policy

    Click Here

Title IX Coordinator

What is a Title IX Coordinator?
The Title IX Coordinator is the university official responsible for ensuring Hallmark University complies with Title IX, including responding to and investigating all complaints of gender discrimination (including sexual harassment and sexual violence) at Hallmark University.

 

cara bass picture
Title IX Coordinator: Cara Bass
Office of Human Resources
10401 IH-10 West
San Antonio, TX 78230
(210) 969-7523
TitleIX@hallmarkuniversity.edu
billie jean ring picture
Deputy Title IX Coordinator: Billie Jean Ring
Office of Student Affairs
10401 IH-10 West
San Antonio, TX 78230
(210) 969-7523
TitleIX@hallmarkuniversity.edu
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